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Cashew



Interactions

Cashew/Drug Interactions:
  • Angiotensin II receptor antagonist (A2R blockers)Angiotensin II receptor antagonist (A2R blockers): In vitro studies show that the methanol:dicloromethane extracts of the bark and leaves of Anacardium occidentale L. inhibited [3H]-AT II binding (angiotensin II AT1 receptor) more than 50% (15).
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: In vitro studies indicate that crude cashew extract exhibited good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Gram-negative bacteria (6).
  • AntidiarrhealsAntidiarrheals: Studies in animals indicate that tannins, a type of plant polyphenol found in cashew, demonstrated anti-inflammatory and astringent effects, making cashew potentially effective in treating diarrhea (74; 75).
  • AntifungalsAntifungals: The supernatant of Anacardium occidentale has been shown in vitro to exert antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans, and it appears to be the separation of macromolecules from metabolites that enhanced the antifungal activity (8).
  • Anti-inflammatoriesAnti-inflammatories: Studies in animals indicate that tannins, a type of plant polyphenol found in cashew, demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects (74; 75).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: In in vitro research, cashew extract demonstrated a positive association between antioxidant activity and the ability to upregulate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. This effect was attributed to the high phenol content of cashew (10).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Anacardic acid from cashew nut shell liquid is a potent inhibitor of p300 and p300/CBP-associated factor histone acetyltransferase activities in vitro. Histone acetyltransferases are a group of enzymes thatplay a significant role in the regulation of gene expression (14). Semecarpus anacardium, which is closely related to Anacardium occidentale, has been shown to induce apoptosis in human tumor cell lines in vitro (76; 13; 12). However, one case report has shown that chronic exposure to cashew nut oil caused oral carcinoma (OC) in a female who refrained from any type of tobacco and betel nut habits (34).
  • AntiviralsAntivirals: Extracts from Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae) leaves (4mcg/mL) showed activity against simian rotavirus (82.2% inhibition), a common virus that leads to severe diarrhea and dehydration and is responsible for causing approximately half a million deaths worldwide each year (11).
  • Calcium channel blockersCalcium channel blockers: In vitro studies have examined the ability of 18-dialkyl 1,4-dihydro-4-(2'alkoxy-6'-pentadecylphenyl)-2,6-dimethyl-3,5 pyridine, which is a dicarboxylate from anacardic acid, a natural compound from cashew nut shells, to block action on L- and T-type calcium channels transiently expressed in a tSA-201 cell line (16).
  • Cardiovascular agentsCardiovascular agents: Studies exist that indicate a possible relationship between cashew (Anacardium occidentale) and cardiac glycogen levels (4).
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: Semecarpus anacardium (SA) Linn. (Anacardiaceae) is a plant closely related to Anacardium occidentale. In vitro, SA extract inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-12p40 (9).

Cashew/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • Angiotensin II receptor-inhibitorsAngiotensin II receptor-inhibitors: In vitro studies show that the methanol:dicloromethane extracts of the bark and leaves of Anacardium occidentale L. inhibited [3H]-AT II binding (angiotensin II AT1 receptor) more than 50% (15).
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: In vitro studies indicate that crude cashew extract exhibited good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Gram-negative bacteria (6).
  • AntidiarrhealsAntidiarrheals: Studies in animals indicate that tannins, a type of plant polyphenol found in cashew, demonstrated anti-inflammatory and astringent effects, making cashew potentially effective in treating diarrhea (74; 75).
  • AntifungalsAntifungals: The supernatant of Anacardium occidentale has been shown in vitro to exert antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans, and it appears to be the separation of macromolecules from metabolites that enhanced the antifungal activity (8).
  • Anti-inflammatoriesAnti-inflammatories: Studies in animals indicate that tannins, a type of plant polyphenol found in cashew, demonstrated anti-inflammatory effects (74; 75).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: In in vitro research, cashew extract demonstrated a positive association between antioxidant activity and the ability to upregulate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. This effect was attributed to the high phenol content of cashew (10).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Anacardic acid from cashew nut shell liquid is a potent inhibitor of p300 and p300/CBP-associated factor histone acetyltransferase activities in vitro (14). Semecarpus anacardium, which is closely related to Anacardium occidentale, has been shown to induce apoptosis in human tumor cell lines in vitro (76; 13; 12).
  • AntioxidantsAntioxidants: Cashew extracts demonstrated a positive association between antioxidant activity and the ability to upregulate low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor in vitro (10).
  • AntiviralsAntivirals: Extracts from Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae) leaves (4mcg/mL) showed activity against simian rotavirus (82.2% inhibition), a common virus that leads to severe diarrhea and dehydration and is responsible for causing approximately half a million deaths worldwide each year (11).
  • Cardiovascular agentsCardiovascular agents: In vitro studies have examined the ability of 18-dialkyl 1,4-dihydro-4-(2'alkoxy-6'-pentadecylphenyl)-2,6-dimethyl-3,5 pyridine, which is a dicarboxylate from anacardic acid, a natural compound from cashew nut shells, to block action on L- and T-type calcium channels transiently expressed in tSA-201 cells (16). Studies exists that indicate a possible relationship between cashew (Anacardium occidentale) and cardiac glycogen levels (4).
  • ImmunomodulatorsImmunomodulators: Semecarpus anacardium (SA) Linn. (Anacardiaceae) is a plant closely related to Anacardium occidentale. In vitro, SA extract inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-12p40 (9).

Cashew/Food Interactions:
  • Insufficient available evidence.

Cashew/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood pressureBlood pressure: In vitro studies show that the methanol:dicloromethane extracts of the bark and leaves of Anacardium occidentale L. inhibited [3H]-AT II binding (angiotensin II AT1 receptor) more than 50% (15). In vitro studies have also examined the ability of 18-dialkyl 1,4-dihydro-4-(2'alkoxy-6'-pentadecylphenyl)-2,6-dimethyl-3,5 pyridine, which is a dicarboxylate from anacardic acid, a natural compound from cashew nut shells, to block action on L- and T-type calcium channels transiently expressed in tSA-201 cells (16).
  • Cancer screeningCancer screening: Anacardic acid from cashew nut shell liquid is a potent inhibitor of p300 and p300/CBP-associated factor histone acetyltransferase activities, including the regulation of gene expression, in vitro, and dysfunction of these enzymes is often associated with the manifestation of various diseases, including cancer (14). Semecarpus anacardium, which is closely related to Anacardium occidentale, has been shown to induce apoptosis in human tumor cell lines in vitro (76; 13; 12).
  • CulturesCultures: In vitro, crude cashew extract exhibited good antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, two Gram-negative bacteria (6) and antifungal activity against Cryptococcus neoformans (8).
  • CytokinesCytokines: Semecarpus anacardium (SA) Linn. (Anacardiaceae) is a plant closely related to Anacardium occidentale. In vitro, SA extract inhibited the production of proinflammatory cytokines IL-1beta and IL-12p40 (9).
  • Liver function testsLiver function tests: Cashew may cause erroneously high bilirubin absorbance readings (77).
  • Viral loadViral load: Extracts from Anacardium occidentale L. (Anacardiaceae) leaves (4mcg/mL) showed activity against simian rotavirus (82.2% inhibition) (11).

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.